Public safety training goes virtual

Posted: September 26, 2011 in Serious games, Technology, Virtual reality
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Public safety is a tricky business. It is, by its nature, risky: Paramedics, firefighters, police, EMTs, first responders—they have dangerous jobs, and often put themselves in harm’s way to help others. When they go to work, lives are often at stake—sometimes theirs, sometimes ours, and sometimes both. For reasons that should be obvious, adequate and effective training of individuals pursuing this line of work is absolutely critical: Call me crazy, but getting thrown cold into an emergency situation doesn’t strike me as the best way to assess your skills.

Okay, so training is important. However, it’s also expensive, and budgets for public safety at all levels—local, state and federal—are stretched even during times of economic prosperity. It’s time-intensive as well, can be limited in reach, and usually requires safety personnel to travel outside their communities—taking them off the streets and reducing their departments’ abilities to respond to emergencies at home. I don’t know about you, but I’m not aware of any towns nearby that have dedicated training facilities on-site.

So how do we reconcile the need for comprehensive training with the expense of providing it?

Wait for it…

By using videogames, of course (you expected a different answer, maybe?).

This is exactly what groups like Virtual Heroes do for a living. Using 3-D game engines and game design techniques, Virtual Heroes builds scenarios within an immersive, virtual environment to help medical, military, public safety and healthcare professionals respond to catastrophic events in the real world. One of their flagship products, HumanSim, allows healthcare workers to sharpen their skills in realistic situations without risking real lives. They also create simulations for commercial clients who want to expand their ability to deliver on-the-job safety training. I watched one targeted at electrical workers. Arc flashes are scary things…

Okay, but how does this impact you, me, a typical big-city urbanite, or the average citizen in small town America? Let me bring this home. I live in western Massachusetts. Belchertown, to be exact. The end of last week, our local paper, The Sentinel, reported a story from the next town over about police and fire personnel training on an immersive, 3-D driving simulator. Big deal, right?

Actually, it is. First, the simulator was brought to them—right into the police and fire departments—allowing more personnel to go through the training than if the departments had to send them off-site. Also, had there been an emergency during the training sessions (thankfully, there were none), every single police officer or firefighter would have been available to respond. Perhaps more importantly, though, this training was provided free of charge, allowing cash-strapped departments to offer driver training to all their personnel—something they wouldn’t be able to afford otherwise. According to Granby Police Chief Alan Wishart, who also took a turn behind the wheel,

We would not be able to do this on our own. If it wasn’t for them [Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA)], it could be years before some of the officers saw this type of training. It’s a great opportunity for us.”

Granby Fire Lieutenant Brian Pike agreed, adding that they could provide additional scenarios—and there are hundreds available—without taking out the trucks.

Less emergency worker downtime, more personnel trained, zero cost to the community—it all adds up to more experienced public safety departments, better emergency response, and more lives saved. So the next time you hear a public safety success story, you may have to thank a videogame.

To read the original article, check out The Sentinel here.

You can learn more about Virtual Heroes here.

And you can read more about the Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association’s simulator here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s